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Catanduanes Government

Municipality of Bagamanoc

Bagamanoc Official Seal

  •  Founded: June 12, 1950
  •  Population: 9, 684
  •  District: Lone district
  • Municipality Class: 5th
  •   Zip Code: 4807
  •  Barangay: 18
  •  Area: 9,390 hectares
  •   13° 56'N 124° 17'E

Map of Bagamanoc

BACKGROUND

A daring and adventurous young man from the tribe forced his way across the mouth of the river to look for rattan needed for the repair of his future bride’s family home. Going westward by the shorelines, he finally turned left for the business of venture but before he cut an uphill distance, he saw what appeared to be a chicken, flying above just along the tallest leaves of the pandan shrubs festooning the sea. And every time anybody talks of the place, they would call it “BAGAMANOC” which means the place was like a “chicken”, the literal meaning of Bagamanoc.

 

HISTORY

Bagamanoc Proper was yet nameless, unmarked by the footprints of men. On its sandy soil roamed numerous ferocious quadrupeds of all sizes and wild fowls. There yet stood a variety of big, tall century old trees interlaced with long, tapering some thorny vines brownish with age. Multicolored birds played, song mated laid their eggs on the branches and fed on their luscious fruits.

The crescent, bare grayish black shores you now see was yet less curved, where the low tide waves now lap at the shoreline, grow a row of thick of bush of green pandan shrubs unmolested by the clutches of the claws of the sea. Not far from this place, at what is known as Bagatabao, but more island of the swamp, Bagamanocnons now called Taraga, there was already a chicken raising settlement place from the inhospitable plateau of Panay Island (Catanduanes).

The settlement was bounded on the East and North by the sea, blocked by a swamp and a hostile hill on the South and pressed by the crocodile-infested mouth of what is now known as the Bagamanoc River on the West. Confined to a limited territory by natural forces, the settlement could hardly feed and shelter itself. Moreover, frequent raids by corsairs from Mindanao, Jolo or Borneo for slaves had a serious problem to their existence.

One day, a daring and adventurous young man from the tribe forced his way across the mouth of the river to look for rattan needed for the repair of his future bride’s family house. Going westward by the shoreline, he finally turned left for the business of venture but before he cut an uphill distance, he saw what appeared to be a chicken flying along just above the tallest leaves of pandan shrubs festooning the sea. Back in his tribe, he told the clan on what he saw of the beauty of the place, its abundance with food and building materials and the defense is offered from the pirate’s raid. But as the place has no name to say when referring to that “discovered land” every time anybody talk of the place, they would call it “BAGAMANOC” which means the place was like a “chicken” the very meaning of Bagamanoc.

To detect the coming of the Moro raids, the people erected a watchtower at where the sea laps at the shore nearest the present Municipal Hall. In spite of the tower, many Bagamanocnons still fell into the corsairs’ hand. When the Spaniards came, they found the place a thriving community. They converted the people into Christianity and made a settlement into a municipality under a governadorcillo. Under Spain, the town people constructed a concrete church and municipal hall of stones, limes, molasses and eggs. However, even under the Spaniard rule, Bagamanocnons did not fully submit to the Spanish dominion, although fully sold out to Christianity. During the revolution of 1898-1901, the Bagamanocnon relied their support to the Filipino Revolutionist. In fact, a bloody skirmish took place at Mapulang Labo, where the late Apolonio Cueva skillfully beheaded an American Officer mounted on a horse. When the Americans reorganized the municipal government, the town was reduced to a mere town of Viga, later of Payo, until Bagamanoc became a municipality again in 1950.

Bagamanoc is used to be called a small town of big people and properly so. She had produced a hundred of professionals scattered all over the archipelago who in their modest way are making a name for themselves and for their birth place. The country’s representative to the “Tokyo Olympic Games” in 1924. in the discus throwing event came from this town and the second Catanduanes congressman under an independent Philippines hails from here.As of lately and during the time where the American Bases are still here in the Philippines,Bagamanoc has also been the site of the LORAN ( Long Range Navigation Facilities ) Station primarily installed to protect the country from external threats, among others.

 

AGRICULTURE SECTOR

The major crops in the municipality are food crops (rice, corn, root crops, vegetables and legumes) and cash crops (abaca and coconut). Large parcel of riceland are situated at barangays Quezon, Sta. Tersa, Antipolo and Bagatabao Magsaysay, and Bugao. Abaca and coconut plantation are found inn all barangay, except barangays Poblacion, Sta. Mesa and Sta. Teresa.

The municipality is not identified as a key Livestock Development Area but there are areas in some barangays which are conducive to livestock raising particularly carabao and cattle. These are barangays San Isidro and Suchan. Livestock raising in the municipality are mostly backyard and as work animals.

Identified fishing development areas are the barangays of Quezon, Batabao, Quigaray and Suchan. Most of these fishponds are now for family subsistence and not for commercial production due to its physical state. Asides from the fishponds, large fishing ground abounds in the locality being a coastal area. These are the Bagamanoc Bay. Loroman, Late and Quigaray Cove.

 

COMMERCE AND TRADE SECTOR

The municipality does not have any big commercial establishment nor have much trade and commercial activities to speak of. Existing are about 96 locally registered and license commercial establishment throughout the municipality ranging from a small eatery to retail and wholesale stores. Most of the bigger stores are found at the municipal commercial strip or commercial business district.

Besides from the commercial strip, the municipality has the Municipal Public Market, which is strategically located near the slaughterhouse, Municipal Training Hall and the Bus and Jeepney Terminal.

Almost all the commercial consumers products are being bought at commercial establishments at Virac, which are brought home daily loaded on a passenger’s jeepney/bus or a cargo truck. Agricultural crops are sold directly to buying commercial establishment at Virac.

 

INDUSTRY

The municipality is an agricultural base community whereby necessary resources for agro-industrial undertakings are available. Abundant raw materials from the forest and other agricultural products could be utilized for a cottage or home industry. The vast seas could be tapped as source for raw materials for fish and marine processing business and other livelihood activities for the local fisher folks. Besides form the abundant raw materials, adequate labor force is readily available.

There are no established industry in the locality, what present are small scale rice mills, an off and on small home furniture, leather wear and nipa shingle making.

 

CLIMATE

Like other municipalities of the eastern section of the province and province itself, the climate of the municipality is type II of the Coronas Classification for climatic zones, best described as having no distinct dry season with a very pronounced rainfall, usually heavy during the month from October to January.Typhoon is very much prevalent in this locality due to its geographical positioning fronting the Pacific Ocean.

 

TOPOGRAPHY

Almost 83% of the entire land area of the municipality are mountainous and hilly wherein 56% (43.65 square kilometers) of it is covered by thick forest and 44% or 34.30 square kilometers are planted with abaca, coconut, root crops and perennial trees. The lowland or plain area is about 17% of the total land are or 15.96 square kilometers which comprises the built-up areas, rice land, diversified agricultural lands and others. The mountainous area is located at the western part of the municipality and the hilly or rolling terrain lies eastward to the coastal areas, while the lowland or plain areas are situated along the coastal and river banks.

 

SOIL CLASSIFICATION

The municipal soil is composed of four (4) types, namely: Undifferential Mountain soil, Louisiana Clay, Hydrosol, Bantog Clay and traces of Beach Sand mostly along the coastal areas.

LORAN (US Long Range Aid to Navigation) Ruins

Bagamanoc, Catanduanes

LORAN stands for Long Range Aid to Navigation, a former American naval base built around the early 1950s as an outpost to monitor movements in the Pacific Ocean. Abandoned in 1972, the camp was then used by local coastguards in 1980 and was again abandoned. The former US Coast Guard facility station is no longer operational, but for the locals who used to be civilian employees, for them it is a continuing saga. They would tell stories about seaplanes delivering food supplies and mails, abundant supply of corned beef, men unafraid of rough seas and radar.

LORAN (US Long Range Aid to Navigation) Ruins

Bagamanoc, Catanduanes

LORAN stands for Long Range Aid to Navigation, a former American naval base built around the early 1950s as an outpost to monitor movements in the Pacific Ocean. Abandoned in 1972, the camp was then used by local coastguards in 1980 and was again abandoned. The former US Coast Guard facility station is no longer operational, but for the locals who used to be civilian employees, for them it is a continuing saga. They would tell stories about seaplanes delivering food supplies and mails, abundant supply of corned beef, men unafraid of rough seas and radar.

Ilihan Point Fertility Island

Bagamanoc, Catanduanes

Ilihan Point commonly known as “Boto ni Kurakog” to locals, is a phallic landmass located at the bay of Bagamanoc. “Boto ni Kurakog”, literally translated as “Kurakog’s Penis.” The landmark is a column of earth and loose rock that rises five meters above the sea and resembles the male sex organ, with a healthy shrub growing on top of it. Town officials are promoting daily boat rides to the landmark, for which a tourist hears the story of how the monument came to be and gets the chance to offer a chicken egg at the supposedly enchanted phallic symbol. Known as Fertility Island.

Ilihan Point Fertility Island

Bagamanoc, Catanduanes

Ilihan Point commonly known as “Boto ni Kurakog” to locals, is a phallic landmass located at the bay of Bagamanoc. “Boto ni Kurakog”, literally translated as “Kurakog’s Penis.” The landmark is a column of earth and loose rock that rises five meters above the sea and resembles the male sex organ, with a healthy shrub growing on top of it. Town officials are promoting daily boat rides to the landmark, for which a tourist hears the story of how the monument came to be and gets the chance to offer a chicken egg at the supposedly enchanted phallic symbol. Known as Fertility Island.

Paday Falls

Bagamanoc, Catanduanes

Located at the Municipality of Bagamanoc, Paday Falls boasts of a tall drop surrounded by a canopy of lush greens and sight to behold.

Paday Falls

Bagamanoc, Catanduanes

Located at the Municipality of Bagamanoc, Paday Falls boasts of a tall drop surrounded by a canopy of lush greens and sight to behold.

  • •  Antipolo
  • •  Bacak
  • •  Bagatabao
  • •  Bugao
  • •  Cahan
  • •  Hinipaan
  • •  Magsaysay
  • •  Poblacion
  • •  Quezon (Pancayanan)
  • •  Quigaray
  • •  Sagrada
  • •  Salvacion (Panuto)
  • •  San Isidro
  • •  San Rafael (Mahantod)
  • •  San Vicente
  • •  Santa Mesa
  • •  Santa Teresa
  • •  Suchan

Hon. Remegio B. Villaluna
Mayor

Hon. Odilon Pascua
Vice-Mayor

Councilors

Mark Anthony Pascua

Sherry Ann Peña

Belen Evangelista

Rey Villarino

Rizalito Ayala

Edwin De Leon

Leo Presentacion

Juan Velchez Jr.

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